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  • 4 Healthy Ways to Distract Yourself from Anxiety

    Anxiety is a natural dialogue between our mind and body. It’s a red flag that something might be happening in our surroundings that requires our attention.

    For most of us, anxiety is an uncomfortable but fleeting feeling that occasionally pops up during particularly stressful times. For some, anxiety may be more present and colour more of their daily life. And for others, anxiety is constant torture, a nightmare they can’t awaken from.

    Depending on your level of anxiety, there are some healthy coping strategies you can use to manage it. Here are 4 I recommend:

    Mind Your Mind

    How often are you aware of your thoughts? Our thoughts tend to bubble up from our subconscious without much control from our conscious mind. For those experiencing anxiety, many of these thoughts will be negative and frightening, although the majority will not be based in reality.

    Start to pay attention to the thoughts behind the feelings. Instead of thinking the worst will happen, challenge the thought. What is the realistic likelihood that the worst will happen on a scale of 1 – 10?

    The more you do this, the more you will retrain your mind to process life differently.

    Remind Yourself What Anxiety Is

    Beyond frightful emotions, anxiety often comes with physical sensations like tightness in the chest, rapid heartbeat and shortness of breath. In other words, it can feel like you are dying.

    But you’re not.

    You are having a physical response to an irrational fear or thought. Remind yourself of that ancient dialogue your mind and body are having and know that, in reality, you are okay.

    Learn Your Triggers

    Once you learn to pay attention to your thoughts and remain calm, knowing you are having a natural reaction to what you perceive as a threat, find the threat. Observe your surroundings to see the potential trigger that activated your response. If other people are in the room, notice their reaction to your stimulus. Do they seem uneasy or concerned in the least? Chances are they don’t because the threat is not accurate. Store this information so that your subconscious mind will eventually stop thinking of the trigger as a threat.

    Breathe

    Slow, deep breaths have been shown to calm a person instantly. Your heart rate will slow, your muscles will relax, and your entire body will return to a normal state. Don’t underestimate the power of just taking a moment to breathe.

    If you find you need a bit more help controlling your anxiety, please get in touch with me. I would be more than happy to discuss treatment options with you.